This is probably my favourite British wild flower. It takes me right back to my childhood when they were a common sight in fields and we used to pick them by the handful and stuff them into jam jars filled with water. I grow these from seed many years ago and they have happily spread themselves around the garden.

Yellow flower: Cowslips, Primula veris

When cowslips and primroses grow in close proximity to one another, they cross pollinate to produce an interesting variation called a false oxlip – in a true oxlip, the flowers droop to one side.

False oxslip

The dried, skeletonised flower heads of Hydrangeas look so delicate, yet they have survived whatever the weather has thrown at them recently, bringing an ethereal beauty to the garden border. I have given this image an antique tone.

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The 2nd of February is Candlemas Day, a Christian Church festival. Snowdrops are also known as ‘Candlemas Bells’ so I thought they would be a good choice for my photo of the day.

For me, snowdrops signify the first tentative signs that the garden is awakening from its winter slumber. Roll on spring!

Macro of clump of snowdrops, with bokeh background showing other snowdrops

Check out my review of The Rococo Gardens in Painswick, Gloucestershire to see the snowdrops.