Picked these lovely flowers from my garden this morning, including Sweet box, hellebores, snowdrops and Viburnum Tinus. Most of these you would expect to see in flower at this time of year, but I didn’t expect to find live caterpillars or daisies on the lawn in February!

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The 2nd of February is Candlemas Day, a Christian Church festival. Snowdrops are also known as ‘Candlemas Bells’ so I thought they would be a good choice for my photo of the day.

For me, snowdrops signify the first tentative signs that the garden is awakening from its winter slumber. Roll on spring!

Macro of clump of snowdrops, with bokeh background showing other snowdrops

Check out my review of The Rococo Gardens in Painswick, Gloucestershire to see the snowdrops.

This Ceanothus ‘Yankee Point’ is in full bloom at the moment and it is positively hums all day long with bees visiting the flowers!

Ceanothus 'Yankee Point'

I would certainly recommend this shrub, commonly known as a Californian Lilac, if you are looking for a relatively quick growing evergreen shrub that is easy to look after. It likes a sunny, sheltered spot.

This Ceanothus covers an ugly, south-facing wall and every Spring is a mass of colour. It is self-supporting so doesn’t need wires. After flowering I prune it back to stop it getting top heavy, and restricting its width. It was labelled as growing to five feet in height, and eight feet wide, but it has reached around 15 feet high and wide and I keep it to this size by pruning.

Semi-evergreen Shrub. Flowers April-May. Height 2.5m

For most of the year this is a fairly unremarkable shrub, but when it flowers in April and May, it is the star of the garden. When in bud, the flowers are delicately edged with pink and when open they have the most exquisite scent – it’s a pity it can’t be bottled! Plant near a path or doorway to make the most of the fabulous fragrance.

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The wild primrose is pale yellow with a darker yellow centre and is commonly found on banks and in woodland clearings. It’s name means ‘first rose’ and is also known as ‘Easter Rose’, although it is not a member of the rose family. When you see it flowering, it is a sure sign that spring is on the way. The flowers are edible. Easy to grow and will self seed. Perennial, flowers March-April

Wild primrose

The brightly coloured primroses sold in garden centres are cultivars and are treated as annuals.

Annual primroses in use as bedding plants

Although we are just into autumn, now is the time to think about spring flowers in your garden. Daffodils, hyacinths, tulips and crocuses are widely available right now and will give you a stunning display for very little cost and effort. There is something quite uplifting about the thought that in a few months these lifeless, uninteresting shapes will herald the start of a new gardening year.

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